Blowdown Lake
Blowdown Pass 24
Gott Peak
Gott Peak - Blowdown Pass
2003-August-10

Stein Valley, a jewel close to Vancouver but ironically, hard to reach.  Blowdown Pass is probably best know as an easy-access route via CottonWood Creek to the Stein Valley.  We just arrived to the park boundary, the pass area and the lake are a great day-trip destination.  This time we choose to reach Gott Peak.  We started our climbing at 2000 msn (6560 ft) towards Not Gott Peak

100-0034_IMG.JPG
At 2400 msn we got excellent views of the divide.  On the opposite side we have views of Gotcha Peak.  Very experimented hikers can hike the Peak and reach another peak called Notgott Peak.
100-0037_IMG.JPG
Once we reached the top we got Gott Peak on our left.  The rest of the hikers were out of oxygen and I have to continue alone.  This is the place where Gott Creek is born.  I felt like in a Lunar Landscape
100-0042_IMG.JPG
And then Gott Peak.  The peak and the Creek are named after Frank Gott, a Lillooet hunter, guide, rancher and prospector who managed to get into the 102nd Battalion to serve in World War I by dyeing his silver locks black.  But despite his sharp shooting skills, he was sent back to Canada in 1917, as overage.  Fifteen years later, he got into a feud with a game warden.  When the warden tried to arrest him for possessing an untagged deer, Gott shot him in the back.  The authorities eventually caught up with Gott and demanded his surrender.
100-0050_IMG.JPG
' I am a soldier and I never surrender.' Gott reportedly replied.  He was wounded in the leg and later he died in hospital in Lytton,  it is said that his dead was more from advanced tuberculosis, exposure and lack of nourishment than from the leg wound.  Wardens and police officers aside, the public was in fact rather fond of Gott.  He was given a military funeral.  And a mountain.

Back at Not Gott Peak,  Baby Chow was there, enjoying the no-ending view.
100-0070_IMG.JPG
Here is a view of the road, the road continues farther into the Stein Park but very soon is impassable unless you are walking.  The road was built earlier in the 20th century as access to the Silver Queen Mine (seems that the mine never brought any ore).

And Blowdown lake, a nice base camp to further explore the area if you decide to stay overnight.
100-0084_IMG.JPG
Then back to the road.  The country is all open and the views seem to go on forever.
100-0092_IMG.JPG
We were looking marmots and the descend to the road downstream to the old mine.
100-0094_IMG.JPG 
 

Contact me    Books    Copyrights