Amalfi Coast (Costiera Amalfitana), Italy

March 21, 2016

Just in case, Italian law requires an IDP (International Driving Permit). Also, make sure you know how to drive a stick shift.

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Juan's enemies always go blind from over exposure to pure awesomeness

The Amalfi Coast is a stretch of coastline on the southern coast of the Sorrentine Peninsula in the Province of Salerno in Southern Italy.

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Positano

The Amalfi Coast is a popular tourist destination for the region and Italy as a whole, attracting thousands of tourists annually. In 1997, the Amalfi Coast was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site as a cultural landscape.

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Positano

Positano was a port of the Amalfi Republic in medieval times, and prospered during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

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Positano

By the mid-nineteenth century, however, the town had fallen on hard times. More than half the population emigrated, mostly to America.

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Positano

It began to attract large numbers of tourists in the 1950s, especially after John Steinbeck published his essay about Positano in Harper's Bazaar.

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Positano

Thirteen municipalities are located on the Amalfi Coast, many of them centered on tourism.

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The only land route to the Amalfi Coast is the 40 kilometers (25 mi) long Strada Statale 163 which runs along the coastline from the town of Vietri sul Mare in the east to Positano in the west.

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The road was originally built by the Romans.

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Celebrated visitors to Amalfi included the composer Richard Wagner and the playwright Henrik Ibsen, both of whom completed works whilst staying in Amalfi.

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For the greater part of its route, the road is carved out of the side of the coastal cliffs, giving spectacular views down to the Tyrrhenian Sea and on the other side up to the towering cliffs above.

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The town of Amalfi was the capital of the maritime republic known as the Duchy of Amalfi, an important trading power in the Mediterranean between 839 and around 1200.

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Amalfi

In the 1920s and 1930s, Amalfi was a popular holiday destination for the British upper class and aristocracy.

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Amalfi Cathedral

Amalfi Cathedral (Italian: Cattedrale di Sant'Andrea/Duomo di Amalfi) is a 9th-century Roman Catholic structure in the Piazza del Duomo.

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Amalfi Cathedral Mosaic

It is dedicated to the Apostle Saint Andrew. It has been remodeled several times, adding Romanesque, Byzantine, Gothic, and Baroque elements.

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Amalfi

All sea trade in the Mediterranean was once governed by the 12th-century Tavole Amalfitane, one of the world's oldest maritime codes.

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Amalfi

Flavio Gioia, traditionally considered the first to introduce the mariner's compass to Europe, is said to have been a native of Amalfi.

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Amalfi

In medieval culture Amalfi was famous for its flourishing schools of law and mathematics.

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The Amalfi coast is famed for its production of Limoncello liqueur and the area is a known cultivator of lemons. The correct name is "sfusato amalfitano", and they are typically long and at least double the size of other lemons, with a thick and wrinkled skin and a sweet and juicy flesh without many pips.

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Maiori

Maiori (Neapolitan, Majure; originally Reghinna Maior) has been a popular tourist resort since Roman times, with the longest unbroken stretch of beach on the Amalfi coastline.