Venice - Italy

May 16-17, 2017

Venice is a real miracle of creative genius: a city built on mud, sand and the slime of a difficult, inhospitable landscape.

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Grand Channel

Waterfront palazzos, palaces, and churches make drifting down the Grand Canal feel like cruising through a painting.

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The name is derived from the ancient Veneti people who inhabited the region by the 10th century BC

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Church of Madonna dell'Orto

Madonna dell'Orto is a 1400s church with a Gothic facade & cloisters, plus works by Tintoretto, who is buried here.

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The city was historically the capital of the Republic of Venice (697 to 1797).

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It became part of the Kingdom of Italy in 1866, following a referendum held as a result of the Third Italian War of Independence.

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The Art Biennale, a contemporary visual art exhibition, is so called as it is held binennially, in odd-numbered years.

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Is the original biennale on which others elsewhere in the word are modeled.

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Church of the Holy Apostles of Christ

The Church of the Holy Apostles of Christ is a 7th-century Roman Catholic Church and is one of the oldest churches in the city.

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Interior of the Chapel

The church retains its 16th century layout: a single nave supported by two rows of columns. 

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You should also visit Murano and Burano islands.

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Burano Island

If you are into Murano Glass, in Murano you can see furnaces doing demonstrations of glass manufacturing. 

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Burano is known for its small, brightly painted houses which are popular with artists.  

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The colours of the houses follow a specific system originating from the golden age of its development. 

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If someone wishes to paint their home, one must send a request to the government, who will respond by making notice of the certain colours permitted for that lot.

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The island was probably settled by the Romans. 

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Legend says that the island’s fisherman were the first to paint their houses in bright colors, so they could see them while they were out fishing.

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Lacemaking is another one of little Burano’s big highlights.

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Church of San Martino

The women of the island have been experts at lace since the 1400s, when Leonardo da Vinci himself visited to shop for cloth that he used on the altar at the Duomo di Milano.

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Other attractions include the Church of San Martino, with a leaning campanile and a painting by Giambattista Tiepolo (Crufixion, 1727), the Oratorio di Santa Barbara and the Museum and School of Lacemaking.

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Nowadays, lace stores and ice cream shops and artisan kiosks clutter Burano’s narrow streets.

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Lacemaking is another one of little Burano’s big highlights.

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The Rialto Bridge

Back to Venice the stroll continued by crossing one of the four bridges spanning the Grand Canal.

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Gondolier

The Rialto Bridge is stone arch bridge with a span of 31.80 metres (104.3 ft) and was built between 1588-1591 making it the oldest bridge across the canal.

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Small channel

Piazza San Marco (St Mark's Square) is the principal public square in Venice.

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Piazza San Marco

The Piazza San Marco is not far above sea level and it is quick to flood from storm surges from the Adriatic or heavy rain.

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The Piazza

St. Mark's Campanile is one of the most recognizable symbols of the city.

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St. Mark's Campanile

The tower is 98.6 metres (323 ft) tall and it reached its present form in 1514. The current tower was reconstructed in its present form in 1912 after the collapse of 1902.

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Piazzetta facade of the Doge's Palace

It is believed the two great granite columns were erected about 1170 with the lion first mentioned in 1293.

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The Lion of Venice on the eastern column

The Patriarchal Cathedral Basilica of Saint Mark is the most famous of the city's churches.

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St. Mark's Cathedral

For its opulent design, gold ground mosaics, and its status as a symbol of Venetian wealth and power, from the 11th century on the building has been known by the nickname Chiesa d'Oro (Church of gold).

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Mosaic of the translation of the body of Saint Mark

From perhaps 1063 the present basilica was constructed.

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West facade

Mosaics with scenes showing the history of the relics of Saint Mark from right to left fill the lunettes of the lateral portals.

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Top of portal

The first on the left is the only one on the façade still surviving from the 13th century.

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Portal

The formal subject is the Deposition of the Relics, but it is probably depicted as the crowd leaving San Marco after the ceremonial installation of a new doge.

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Top of portal

The basic structure of the building has not been much altered.

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Portal

Its decoration has changed greatly over time, though the overall impression of the interior with a dazzling display of gold ground mosaics on all ceilings and upper walls remains the same.

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Panorama of San Giorgio Maggiore viewed from the main island

San Giorgio is now best known for the Church of San Giorgio Maggiore, designed by Palladio and begun in 1566. The belltower has a ring of 9 bells in C#.

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Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute on the Grand Canal

The Basilica di Santa Maria della Salute is the most recent of the so-called plague churches and most of the objects of art housed there bear references to the Black Death.

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The gondolas of Venice

A couple hundred years ago there were about 10,000 gondolas but today there are only about 500.

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Churches everywhere

For lovers of music, instruments, and the period of time in which composer Antonio Vivaldi lived and worked, the museum of Music is a gold mine.

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Museum of Music

Inside you’ll find rare instruments and the methods employed to create them (specifically in Venice in the 1700s), like specialized violins and other string instruments.

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Museum of Music

What’s even more rare is that there is no admission fee.

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Museum of Music

There is also an interesting exhibit on Vivaldi which highlights his life and career.

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Grand Canal

If all you really want to do is get into a gondola, you can take a traghetto across the Grand Canal.

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Grand Canal

A traghetto is an empty gondola used to ferry passengers back and forth across the canal.

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Grand Canal

While it might not be so romantic, it's much cheaper and you get a great view of the Grand Canal.

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